Framed vs Frameless Cabinets


Framed Cabinets
FRAMED CABINETS
Popular in the American Market

Framed cabinets have an extra overlaying structure or frame on the front of the box (light brown in the picture).

The door (dark brown) is connected to the box using hinges that are installed on the frame. Older framed cabinets have much larger gaps between doors & drawer fronts where the face frame on the cabinet box is visible.

In the US cabinet market, framed (aka face frame) cabinet construction is the most popular method and uses a solid hardwood constructed frame on the front/face of a cabinet.

Face frame cabinets are generally made with solid hardwood face frames and plywood for the remaining cabinet components.

These cabinets can either be naturally finished to showcase the beauty of the wood or painted/stained to any number of decorative colors.

Frameless Cabinets
FRAMELESS CABINETS
Popular in the European Market

Frameless cabinets do not have an additional face frame.

The door (dark brown) is connected directly to the box cabinet with hinges installed on the box. They are also known as full access cabinets, with no divider between pairs of doors when open.

Even though face frame cabinetry is the most common in the US, there is a large part of the market that builds frameless cabinets. What sets these apart from frame cabinets is there is no face frame on the front of the cabinet.

Frameless cabinet are generally constructed using melamine board with edge banding or veneered/laminated plywood.

With a vast array of materials available, frameless cabinets can be finished in numerous colors, textures, and styles.

 

Note: It’s possible to replace doors on a face framed system, however it is not possible to close the larger gaps where the face frame on the box is visible.


FRAMED CABINETS

Popular in the American Market

Framed Cabinets

Framed cabinets have an extra overlaying structure or frame on the front of the box (light brown in the picture).

The door (dark brown) is connected to the box using hinges that are installed on the frame. Older framed cabinets have much larger gaps between doors & drawer fronts where the face frame on the cabinet box is visible.

In the US cabinet market, framed (aka face frame) cabinet construction is the most popular method and uses a solid hardwood constructed frame on the front/face of a cabinet.

Face frame cabinets are generally made with solid hardwood face frames and plywood for the remaining cabinet components.

These cabinets can either be naturally finished to showcase the beauty of the wood or painted/stained to any number of decorative colors.

 

FRAMELESS CABINETS

Popular in the European Market

Frameless Cabinets

Frameless cabinets do not have an additional face frame.

The door (dark brown) is connected directly to the box cabinet with hinges installed on the box. They are also known as full access cabinets, with no divider between pairs of doors when open.

Even though face frame cabinetry is the most common in the US, there is a large part of the market that builds frameless cabinets. What sets these apart from frame cabinets is there is no face frame on the front of the cabinet.

Frameless cabinet are generally constructed using melamine board with edge banding or veneered/laminated plywood.

With a vast array of materials available, frameless cabinets can be finished in numerous colors, textures, and styles.

 

Note: It’s possible to replace doors on a face framed system, however it is not possible to close the larger gaps where the face frame on the box is visible.

 

 

Getting Started with You Project

 

 

If you would like a quote for new doors and drawer fronts, please email us a list of the following:

 

For doors, we need width x height and quantity of each;

 

For hinge boring size & location info, we need:

  • Distance between the edge of the door and the edge of the hinge cup (ours are normally 5mm, other manufacturers vary and may not be interchangeable with ours)
  • Diameter of the hinge cup (ours are normally 35mm, other manufacturers vary and may not be interchangeable with ours)
  • Distance from the top and bottom edge of the door to the centerlines of the top & bottom hinge cups (ours are normally 3", other manufacturers vary and may not be interchangeable with ours)
  • For doors with more than 2 bores we need the distance from the center of the top & bottom bores to the center of the middle bores

 

For drawer fronts, finished end panels, fillers and toekick pieces, we only need width x height and quantity of each.

Please be sure to include a shipping address and phone number, as well as the finish material you would like.